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10 life lessons from the inimitable Tommy Hilfiger

Source: Vogue

Ahead of being presented with the Outstanding Achievement accolade at the 2021 Fashion Awards, the legendary American designer opened up to Vogue about the milestones that have shaped his illustrious career

BY ALEX KESSLER

At the 2021 Fashion Awards at London’s Royal Albert Hall next month, Tommy Hilfiger will be presented with the Outstanding Achievement Award, a prestigious accolade that has also been handed to the likes of Miuccia Prada, Giorgio Armani and Karl Lagerfeld. “I’m certainly pinching myself,” the legendary American designer tells Vogue. “It’s an honour to be included in a hall of fame with so many other incredible talents.”

With no formal design experience, Hilfiger opened his first business in upstate New York, People’s Place, at the age of 18. A few years later, he launched his eponymous label in New York, and went on to become renowned for his preppy, American sportswear aesthetic. The ’90s brought enormous commercial success, as Hilfiger became one of the first designers to tap into the power of a celebrity endorsement, via famous fans like Snoop Dogg, P Diddy, Coolio and Aaliyah. (The playwright Jeremy O Harris recently paid tribute to an Aaliyah Tommy Hilfiger look in a custom puffer coat at the 2021 Met Gala). “We began to connect with music in a major way,” explains Hilfiger, “at a time when magazines were only using models as cover shots.”

Fast forward to now, and the Tommy Hilfiger brand is one of the most prominent in the world, with flagships and stockists in every major city. Hilfiger continues to forge new paths for his label, collaborating with some of the buzziest celebrity names: Zendaya, Gigi Hadid, Indya Moore and Lewis Hamilton, to name a few. “The idea was that we bring brain power into our brand, and listen to people who were influential in the world of pop culture,” says Hilfiger.

To celebrate his Outstanding Achievement award, Vogue asked the designer to share the 10 life lessons that helped him on the road to success.

If it’s truly your life’s dream, you can start a fashion empire with $150

“When I was a young teen, I would take a trip into New York City, five and a half hours from my home, to find great clothes. When I wore them to school, all of my friends wanted to know where I was getting everything, so at that point in time, I decided I should open my own shop. I started my business with $150 that I’d saved from working at a gas station.”

Don’t like something? Turn it on its head and make it your own

“Growing up, I thought preppy clothes were boring, so I decided to make them cool by making them oversized and colourful, as well as marrying them with sportswear. When I started Tommy Hilfiger in 1985, I was embraced by the youth right away, because I was doing something different to what they had seen before. We were the first designer label to go public in the early ’90s, and then we expanded all over the world.”

Learning how to please the consumer is vital to running a business

“You can have the most famous name in the world, as well as incredible marketing and advertising, but if you don’t have a great product that consumers want, you’re out of business. It’s got to look great, but if it doesn’t fit well, it will never sell. If it’s too expensive, then young people won’t buy it. If you are not on trend, people will move on.”

Clock the brightest stars before they really shine

“We were doing a show in New York and our DJ cancelled, so my brother Andy introduced me to an all-girl music group to perform instead. We dressed them in boys’ clothes, because we didn’t have womenswear at the time, and afterwards I asked my brother who the one in the middle was — who had the most incredible voice — and he said to me that her name was Beyoncé. We formed a relationship with her, and eventually she became the face of our True Star fragrance.”

For a collaboration to be successful, it has to truly be a team effort

“At the start of my career, one of my favourite projects was with Aaliyah, because it was really a collaboration. From then, I decided we should work with more people with distinct aesthetics. We brought in Gigi Hadid, who had a Southern California style and a fresh all-American look, and we actually let her design the clothes. We surrounded her with the right people who helped bring it to life, and that was a huge success. We did the same with Zendaya, Lewis Hamilton and Indya Moore. Plus more to come.”

Never compromise on brand identity, but be open to exploring new avenues

“When the hip hop community started wearing my clothes in the late ’80s, early ’90s, I was really the first to do streetwear, and people didn’t know what to make of it because it was oversized and bright, with enormous logos. Even though it felt entirely new at the time, it still had a preppy backbone to it, which it still does. I continually use the same ingredients to keep the brand DNA intact, but [I’m] always looking to make it fresh.”

The future of fashion is in the metaverse

“I love the digital world — I’m obsessed with where it is going and I think fashion will be an important part of it. E-commerce will be here for a very long time, but I think there are new ways that it can exist. I’m also developing my own video game, and I’m a partner in developing avatars with the EWG [Elite World Group].”

To be successful you have to look ahead, but also at what’s around

“Always picture yourself being as successful as you want to be, but I also learned from looking at other brands and designers. I’m always watching what’s going on in the world of fashion, whether it’s watching the Balmain show or looking at somebody like Demna Gvasalia.”

Your family life can be a source of inspiration

“My mind is constantly working, but I find a balance with my family. My son is a musician; my daughter has her own brand; my other daughter is an artist; my stepson plays professional tennis; and they’re always influencing me. I’m interested in what they’re wearing, where they’re going, and where they’re travelling to.”

Giving back is just as rewarding as success itself

“If you have any sort of success, you should find a way to give back, whether it is to your favourite charity or helping young people in need. We’re an incredibly generous group within the Tommy Hilfiger organisation, and I believe it all came from my mother who brought up nine children. Regardless of how much you have, there are people who have less than you and you should try to help.”

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Business

Industry Field Service Is Reshaping How The Home Market Will Be Managed

Mark Wilding is Vice President Global Customer Transformation at ServiceMax.

“Working from home” never used to be an option for repair technicians, but even they have adapted. What’s perhaps more interesting is that the changes taking place in the field service industry today are already shaping how products are serviced in our home in future.

While the pandemic accelerated technology adoption, it also created another animal – rising customer expectation. As so many products and services went virtual, it fuelled an instant gratification gene in people, where the notion of waiting for anything to be fixed suddenly became unacceptable. Most organizations were faced with two choices – shrug (virtually of course) and carry on as normal or try and meet those expectations using new technologies to enable touchless and self-services.

Undoubtedly this has changed a few things. It’s certainly changed attitudes to the value of field service and the on-going challenges it faces. As McKinsey wrote in an article recently, “services matter in every industry, both as a direct source of value and as an enabler of value creation.” The field service role in customer experience and loyalty that has become more prominent.

Virtual first, physical second rapidly became the default service approach for many organizations at the industry level – a policy that remains in place for most. Thanks to technology, remote eyes on the asset enable arm’s length triage so if an engineer is required, they arrive on site with insight and intelligence about the issue. In this way, remote service has significantly enhanced on-site service, rather than being a poor virtual substitute.

Forefront of Change

And it’s trickling down into consumer life. The pandemic accelerated it, but it’s been coming for some time. Field service teams have been at the forefront of changing attitudes, with engineers tasked with customer service roles and upselling, as well, of course, fixing faulty parts and machines. With more homes and offices connected through increasingly reliable broadband, and more wide spread interconnectivity and smart automation all around us,  we have seen the rise in IoT devices and in turn, the rise in remote servicing of these products – interestingly, global spending on IoT products is forecast to reach $1.1 trillion in 2023. The challenge now for field service teams, is how to meet the rising expectations of customers in an increasingly touchless world?

As a recent World Economic Report claims, homes are indeed getting smarter – over 130 million households are now home to at least one smart speaker while 77 million have a digital security camera – and with that smartness comes both the need and ability to enable remote servicing. For the manufacturers this also means change at their end as well. Service considerations must be baked into products at the design level. Service cannot be an afterthought.

What this means for field service teams is a rapid shift in how the home market is managed. It’s part of a wider trend, kickstarted during the pandemic, of an end-to-end contactless experience for consumers. Remote service, either augmented or via video calls or even self-service tools will continue to grow in importance but also in capability. The technology is improving rapidly, to enable automated, remote diagnostics, for example. What this means is that more than ever before, field service engineers will have up-to-date data on devices and products in our homes, including breakdowns, required parts and inventory availability – in short, complete oversight of product status and the needs of the customer.

We’ve already seen this in industry. The remote-first acceleration of field service in B2B and industrial services holds the blueprint for how domestic and B2C services are delivered in the home in the next few years. It’s a natural trickle-down effect. Also, given this increasing touchless nature of business relationships with customers, field service teams may be the only person from the company that customers actually meet in person. More than ever before, field engineers will be the public face of brands.

As more items in the home become more connected, we’ll see more proactive interaction from OEMs and more IoT interaction with the user to effectively address technical issues. Consumers will become the first line of service thanks to technology. Soon, almost all products will be designed for service. A manufacturer can help you diagnose the problem remotely, then send you the required part you that plug in while set up is done in the background. This minimizes need for service visits which are most of cost.

This of course impacts required skills and training, as well information sharing and connectivity. Communication will be key, not just to get products repaired but to do it in a way that looks after the customer journey. Professional field service best practice is now spilling into domestic life, and this will continue over the next five years. Field service teams must adapt and use the tools at their disposal to ensure good customer experience.

The advances we’re seeing in field service management today are shaping the future of service across multiple industries and are paving the way for consumer service in our homes. Far-greater network availability and capability will drive broad shifts in the business landscape, from the digitization of manufacturing through wireless control of mobile tools, machines and appliances.

Until then, as field service teams move forward into a continuously remote-first world of high consumer expectations, understanding what does and doesn’t work in the eye of those consumers will become increasingly key to successful experiences.

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Lifestyle

Keeping pets protected during heatwaves this summer

We’ve been lucky to have been hit with some great weather this summer, however, some days have been exceptionally hot and causing us discomfort to the point where we don’t want to leave the house! Our pets can also struggle in this heat and if not looked after correctly, can lead to life threatening issues for them. 

Dr. Sarah Machell, Medical Director for Vetster, has shared her top five top tips to ensure that our pets can enjoy the summer days as much as we can.

Vetster, is a digital platform that connects licensed vets with pet owners virtually, with 24/7 online appointments, launches in the UK this summer.

1.  Provide adequate rest, shade, and ventilation

Coping with high temperatures and humidity is tough enough on its own, but it’s even more difficult for pets who are exercising in direct sunlight and don’t have adequate ventilation. Limit outdoor activities to early mornings and late evenings when it’s cooler. When walking your pet, choose shady routes off the pavement.  Ensure outdoor pets have shady, ventilated places to escape the heat.  Keep in mind that pets also rely on evaporation for cooling, regardless of if they sweat like horses or pant like dogs, and high humidity decreases the effect of evaporation. This means your pet needs you to keep an eye on the heat index for them as well as for you.  Be sure your pets have easy access to a steady supply of clean water. Pets are naturally wired to stay hydrated as long as they are healthy and avoid heavy exercise in the heat, so there’s no need to try to encourage your pet to drink more.  Just make sure the water supply is in easy reach and doesn’t run dry. 

 2. Be wary of paws on the hot pavement! 

When the weather gets extremely hot, so does the pavement—asphalt, in particular. If you’re taking your dog out for a walk, try to remember that they don’t have shoes to protect against the heat. Even though paw pads are extremely tough, hot surfaces can burn them. Consider using padded booties for their paws to create a barrier between paw pads and the hot concrete.  Better yet, try to steer clear of the streets and walk on the cool grass instead. If there’s an opportunity to wade through some clean water or catch the spray from a sprinkler, that’s even better. Remember that pavement retains heat and you still need to be aware of the risks when you go for walks in the evening.

3. Look out for signs of heatstroke 

Heatstroke is a very serious condition and one to look out for in your pets. As a pet parent, it’s important to be aware of your pet’s fitness level and avoid overexertion when the weather’s too hot or humid. Less athletic dogs, dogs with underlying illnesses, and brachycephalic breeds are at higher risk for developing heatstroke, so keep an extra close eye on them. Heatstroke is life-threatening, but it can be avoided if you take action to cool your pet when they show early signs of heat stress. If your dog doesn’t want to keep walking, lies down in the shade, or digs up cool dirt to lie in, those are clues they’re getting too hot.  Excessive panting that doesn’t improve after a short rest is another indicator. Get out of the heat and offer water to keep the threat of heatstroke from escalating.  Splash down hot ears, paws, and bellies with water to achieve more rapid cooling.

4 Never leave your pet unattended in a hot vehicle 

Heatstroke can happen in the blink of an eye—it cannot be stressed enough that you should never, ever leave your pet unattended in a vehicle. This is true even if you leave the windows down for fresh air or if you think you’ll only be gone for a few minutes. Studies show that even if the outdoor temperature is 72℉ (22°C), a car can rise up to 117℉ (47°C) in only an hour. Imagine how quickly a car can become dangerously hot when outdoor temperatures are a balmy 86℉ (30°C). Even if you’re leaving your car unattended for a minute or think that leaving a window open will help – the life-or-death gamble you’re taking isn’t worth it.

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Business

5 Reasons To Consider Going Into ‘Unretirement’

Mike Reid, Founder and Chairman of Goldster

As Cameron Diaz turns 50 this August, the retired Hollywood star is set to make a comeback in the new Netflix comedy, ‘Back in Action’, alongside co-star Jamie Foxx. Diaz has been out of the spotlight for eight years, so why did she come out of retirement and jump back into acting?
For us non-A list celebrities, retirement is typically seen as a midday game of golf, cream tea, and long days in the garden. But what if the idea of ‘taking it easy’ isn’t for you? You’re certainly not alone, and it might be time to consider instead going into ‘unretirement’. Mike Reid, Founder and Chairman of Goldster, a digital platform created to inspire over 50s to lead a more active and fulfilling life, shares five reasons why many retirees are rejecting the idea of sitting back, and instead returning to work or exploring new interests:

  1. Itchy Feet
    Currently, the UK age for retirement is 66, while life expectancy is 79 for men and 83 for women. This means the average British female spends 17 years in retirement – that’s over 6,200 days – which is a long time considering it’s not unusual to start feeling a bit twitchy during a two-week holiday at the beach!
    Instead of spending some of the greatest years of your life twiddling your thumbs while the years slip by, why not get yourself back out there to keep your mind, body and soul occupied – all the while making extra friends, picking up additional skills and earning some extra cash along the way.
  2. Healthy mind
    The Goldster team has discovered that maintaining a strong cognitive state can support healthy ageing, and that ‘going to work’ can be hugely beneficial. It’s a myth that giving up and retiring at 66 is the best move for everyone. In fact, experts often advise doing the opposite and embracing new roles and experiences at this age. Even if you don’t want to return to the office, taking classes, developing new hobbies and interests, and challenging yourself every day can make you feel good, especially when the brain gets to enjoy a rigorous workout.
    You can strengthen your mind with something as simple as picking out a new book, or really stretch your limits by taking up art, creative writing or even learning a new language. Whatever you decide to pursue, make sure it’s something you enjoy and not something you’ll start to see as a chore. Really not connecting with those French lessons? There’s no shame in saying “au revoir” and trying something else out instead.
  3. Emotional Wellbeing
    We believe there are multiple reasons why an increasing number of people are deciding to clock back on and clock-off from ‘taking it easy.’ Socialising, interacting and carrying out tasks all help boost self-confidence. In the UK, 1.4 million people over the age of 65 are often lonely, according to Age UK. Did you know that loneliness is now widely recognised as a major problem? Going back to work can help with loneliness and avoiding long-term depression.
    Working also helps maintain a routine. It’s a well-known fact that we’re creatures of habit and routines deliver a structure, promoting health and wellness. Stress management, good health, and better sleep are all benefitted by a routine: taking a job or classes with regular schedules, or even creating your own activity calendar and trying your best to stick to it, can be hugely beneficial.
  4. Physical Benefits
    Unretiring helps you explore interests that you might feel had already passed you by, and perhaps you’d even like to try something more physical than what you’re used to. There are many jobs and activities that get you up and about, and even something so simple as spending more time on your feet instead of sitting down can be greatly beneficial to your health.
    While you’re in this physical mood, you could even pick out a new sport or hobby too. Maybe you’ve always wanted to give yoga a try, or you used to dance the night away but haven’t done so for a while. Your 50s are the time for you to do what you love. Of course, it doesn’t have to be anything too strenuous: something low-impact like thai chi or a gentle stroll might be more your thing.
  5. Income boost
    According to Government statistics, one-third of all workers in the UK are over the age of 50, and a large study undertaken in 2017 found that a quarter of retirees changed their minds and headed back to work, usually within five years of having clocked-off.
    Income was found to a be major motivation – 50% who chose to unretire were still paying off their mortgages. With all the benefits to your mental and physical health that getting back to work brings, earning some extra money is also a huge and welcome advantage. Why stay at home when you could be earning a few bob and saving enough to take that extra special holiday you’ve been thinking about or buying something nice for your loved ones?

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