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The Great Resignation… how did we get here, and how do we get back?

People the world over are leaving their jobs in droves.

2021 supercharged a period dubbed ‘The Great Resignation. This has seen workers leave their jobs at historic rates. The data on hand is showing that the Great Resignation is more than just anecdotal and while it started Stateside, its influence reached our shores long ago.

Companies are feeling the pinch, and many expect it to worsen still. In an article by the Evening Standard, UK quit rates recently reached their highest levels since 2009. Redundancies in the UK are at their lowest since the mid 90’s, while the level of open vacancies is the highest on record.

So, how did we get here?

The last two years cleared the decks for so many of us, now as things begin to come back to a modicum of what they once were, people have realised that as the world has changed, so too have they.

COVID was the catalyst for many individuals to make radical work/life choices and changes. More time spent at home with the family gave many greater clarity on where their priorities lie.   This refocusing of priorities is one factor around The Great Resignation; even with all the will and management skill in the world, the minds of these individuals would not be so easily swayed.

Then we have the individuals who felt that they had no other choice other than to resign or quit their roles. The rationale here could be anything from a combination of low pay, mismanagement, a complete absence of management and direction from above, feeling under supported, under resourced and over worked during COVID.

Without sounding too evangelical, these are the individuals who could have been saved.

This group of ‘Great Resignators’, are casualties of a system of management and governance which, it would seem, has paid little attention to their wants, and needs, until it was too late.

Now I cannot begin to lay blame at the doorsteps of all managers. To tar everyone with that particular brush would be unwise and unfair.

But what I can do, is tell managers that there is a better way… and it lies in data.

My particular area of expertise is that of human experience, and together with my business partner Dr Jonathan Pitts, we developed a methodology of aggregating quantitative data based on qualitative experiences, to provide businesses with a means of assessing and anticipating the need and requirements of their workforce on a limitless sliding scale.

So, the last two years have been particularly poignant as we’ve seen many businesses take strategies which they have been ‘developing’ for years, around digital transformation, and throw them into the fast lane with only limited knowledge or understanding.

A recent survey we undertook with high level executives across Europe and the UK pointed to this. With over 70% of the business leaders we canvassed planning to shift to a hybrid workplace, we found many are clearly ill-prepared for the change.

Nearly a quarter (24%) of them admitted they’re not effective at understanding the digital requirements of employees. Less than one in five (19%) said they were ‘very effective’ in understanding the link between digital tools and employee wellbeing – in fact, 24% said they were either ‘not very’ or ‘not at all’ effective in this area. And 29% of these executives said ‘understanding employee requirements’ is one of the top challenges they now face, along with ensuring that workers have access to the right tools and technologies (24%).

It’s understandable then that over two thirds (67%) of the business leaders we spoke to are becoming increasingly concerned about the impact of digital inequality on employees.

According to our own benchmarking data, on average, the bottom 10 per cent of a company experiencing the worst digital inequality, will spend six hours a month trying to catch-up – the best part of a working day.

This can cause increased frustration and vastly reduced employee wellbeing, which can simply be caused by things like lagging load times, connectivity delays, and interrupted conversations. This might lead to falling behind or having to catch up during the employees’ personal time. Deadlines and targets may not be hit, impacting performance and potentially the future of individual careers.

But what does this have to do with The Great Resignation?

So far, the story of The Great Resignation has been told from the viewpoint of the employee. Our Reconfigured data, delves into the other side of this spectrum… and a spectrum it is, for this is not a black and white matter.

Reconfigured has shown us, that at an organisational level many C-Suite level executives felt unsure and unprepared about how to steer their digital transformation into a post-covid hybrid working world.

This feeds directly into the employee experience. People who feel frustrated, over-worked, under-valued and don’t have the tools to effectively do their jobs, owe business leaders no loyalty. Their hearts and heads are not in their roles and a combination of COVID, a groundswell of media attention around the Great Resignation only seeks to reinforce that they are not alone.

This creates a buckaroo effect, which requires a rapid response from business leaders to remedy.

Put simply, these individuals have everything to gain and nothing to lose by leaving an organisation they feel they owe no loyalty towards.

But why is that?

Maybe management didn’t check in regularly enough as they tried to fulfil their roles from the kitchen table. Maybe Leadership wasn’t active enough in making sure they had the right tools to work effectively and efficiently at home. Maybe the combination of workload and resource finally becoming unmanageable without the proper hybrid facilities to reach out to peers and colleagues, with individuals just left to their own devices, literally.  

The reasons why could be one, or all, of these things, maybe even with a few extra thrown in for good measure.

Moving forward, the ability to accurately measure a hybrid worker’s digital environment is critical. Although a lot of businesses may have IT-level monitoring in place to analyse the performance of their digital tools for employees, far fewer understand the critical need to quantify the human experience of technology and the organisational-level impact that it can have.

At this stage of The Great Resignation, what is certain is that business leaders need to sit up and learn from this. Because, if they don’t then they may just find themselves in the same situation, 12 or 18 months down the line.

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Business

Digital Banking – a hedge against uncertainty?

Source: Finance Derivative

Ankit Shah, Head of Digital Banking, Apex Group

The story of the 2020’s thus far is one of crisis. First the world was plunged into a global pandemic which saw the locking down of people and economies across the world. Now we deal with the inevitable economic consequences as currencies devalue and inflation bites. This has been compounded by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and subsequent energy politics.

And the outlook remains uncertain. Tensions continue to build between China and Taiwan and inflationary conditions are forecast to continue well into 2023. This uncertainty is impacting everyone, and every sector. And finance is no exception with effects being felt everywhere from commodity and FX markets to global supply chains.

But it’s not all doom and gloom. Rollercoaster markets and an ever-evolving geopolitical situation have made 2022 a tricky year far, but, despite the challenges, digital banking has proven resilient. In fact, the adoption of digital banking services has continued to grow over the last few years, and is predicted to continue.

So, what are the forces driving this resilience?

In an increasingly digital world and economy, digital banking comes with some advantages baked in, which have seen the sector continue to succeed despite the tumult in the wider world. In fact, the crises which have shaped the decade so far may even have been to the advantage of digital banking. Just as during the pandemic, technologies which could facilitate remote working saw a huge uptick in users, so to digital banking is well suited to a world where both people, and institutions demand the convenience that online banking services offer.

And while uptake of digital banking services is widespread amongst retail consumers, a trend likely to continue as digital first generations like Gen Z become an ever-greater proportion of the consumer market, uptake amongst corporate and institutional customers has been slower. This is largely down to a lack of fintech businesses serving the more complex needs of the institutional market, but, in a post-Covid world of hybrid working business, corporate clients are looking for the same ease of use and geographic freedom in their banking that is enjoyed by retail consumers.

This is not just a pipe dream – with the recent roll out of Apex Group’s Digital Banking services, institutions can enjoy the kind of multi-currency, cloud-based banking solutions, with 24/7 account access that many of us take for granted when it comes to our personal banking.

Staying compliant

One significant difference between retail and business accounts however, for banking service providers, is the relative levels of compliance which are needed. While compliance is crucial in the delivery of all financial services, running compliance on multi-million pound transactions between international businesses brings with it a level of complexity that an individual buying goods and services online doesn’t.

For digital banking services providers, this situation is further compounded by guidance earlier this year from HM Treasury – against the backdrop of the Russia-Ukraine conflict- requiring enhanced levels of compliance and due diligence when it comes to doing business with “a high-risk third country or in relation to any relevant transaction where either of the parties to the transaction is established in a high-risk third country or with a sanctioned individual.”

So, can digital banks meet these standards while also providing institutions with the kind of easily accessible, mobile service which retail customers enjoy?

The answer is yes and again, once initial hurdles are overcome, digital banking brings with it features which give it the edge over traditional banking services. Paperless processes, for example, mean greater transparency and allow for better and more efficient use of data. This means AI can be employed to search documents, as well as provide verification. It also means compliance processes, often notoriously complicated, become easier to track. Indeed, digitising time intensive manual process means the risk of human error in the compliance process is reduced.

Digital banking can also better integrate transaction monitoring tools, helping businesses identify fraud and irregularity more quickly. This can be hugely important, especially in the times of heightened risk we find ourselves in, where falling foul of a sanctions regime could have significant legal, financial and reputational consequences.

Cross-border business

Our world is increasingly globalised, and so is business. For corporate and institutional banking customers, being able to operate seamlessly across borders is key to the operation of their business.

This brings with it challenges, which are again compounded by difficult geopolitical and economic circumstances. In recent weeks for example, we’ve seen significant flux on FX markets which can have real consequences for businesses or institutional investors who are buying and selling assets in multiple currencies and jurisdictions. The ability to move quickly then, and transact in a currency of choice, is vital. Advanced digital banking platforms can help – offering automated money market fund sweeps in multiple core currencies to help their clients optimise their investment returns and effectively manage liquidity.

Control admin uncertainty

In times of uncertainty, digital banking can provide additional comfort via customisable multi-level payment approvals to enhance control of what is being paid out of business accounts, with custom limits available for different users or members of a team. Transparency and accountability are also essential, with corporate clients requiring fully integrated digital reporting and statements and instant visibility with transaction cost and  balances updated in real-time.

Outlook

For some, the perception remains that digital banking is the upstart industry trying to offer the services that the traditional banking industry has built itself upon. Increasingly however, the reality is that the pressure is on traditional banks to try and stake a claim to some of the territory being taken by digital first financial services.

With a whole range of features built in which make them well suited to business in a digital world, digital banking is on a growth trajectory. Until now, much of the focus has been upon the roll-out of services to retail consumers, but with features such as automated compliance, effortless international transactions and powerful AI coming as standard for many digital banks, the digital offering to the corporate world looks increasingly attractive.

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Business

Anyone Can Become an R&D Tax Expert with the Right Foundations

Source: Finance Derivative

Ian Cashin is a Customer Success Manager at Fintech company and R&D tax software provider WhisperClaims

For accounting firms, R&D tax credits offer a substantial opportunity to boost revenue and strengthen client relationships. According to Ian Cashin, Customer Success Manager at WhisperClaims, perceived complexities can be overcome with the right approach and support. Indeed, by embracing a few simple practices, any company can become an expert in R&D tax.

Building Confidence

Growing revenue through new business is far more challenging than unlocking revenue from an existing client base. However, a significant number of accounting firms are losing out on value-added opportunities as a result of their lack of confidence or knowledge in R&D tax relief.

Yet, advisors who follow best practice are now in an ideal position to use their extensive client knowledge to mitigate their clients’ risk of and potential exposure to interrogation over fraudulent claims, ahead of HMRC’s introduction of more stringent R&D tax processes in April 2023.

So why are firms reluctant? There is no doubt that the R&D tax credit procedure is different. Compared to other areas of tax regulation, it leaves greater room for interpretation. But it is readily understandable by a qualified accountant – even an unqualified trainee. Understanding what HMRC considers to fall under the scope of research and development is key. Astrophysicists and Formula 1 manufacturers are not the only people who employ science and technology to overcome business challenges. Every day, UK firms of all sizes engage in R&D activities, from civil engineers to food manufacturers, yet far too many have not yet filed claims, losing out on critical cash.

The most important thing to keep in mind is that, as an accountant, you already have a far deeper relationship with your client compared to any other service provider. Once you have raised your level of understanding, you are in the perfect position to optimise this.

Leveraging  Insight

Accountants already have a unique understanding of their clients’ operations –  insight which,  as professional advisors, will help to highlight companies most likely to qualify for an R&D tax rebate. Furthermore, with access to tools like R&D tax claim preparation technology, developed by R&D tax professionals, they are able to significantly speed up the process. This technology enables accountants to easily determine the top targets within their client base, indicating where to focus the efforts of their emerging R&D tax service.

Using this priority list in conjunction with their understanding of the criteria HMRC stipulates, an accountant can leverage their client knowledge and relationship to engage in a conversation regarding daily R&D activities and unlock potential tax relief opportunities.

Moreover, facilitated by a specialist R&D tax claims preparation platform, accountants can be assured of a structured process that prompts the right questions to ask clients during these conversations, and highlights answers that are either in sync with, or fall outside of, the HMRC parameters. For instance, ca restaurant owner adding vegan alternatives to the menu is not on the same level as a food producer starting the development and manufacturing of a fully plant-based product line. The latter will undoubtedly be eligible for R&D tax assistance, but not the former. Accountants should use their position as “professional advisors” in this situation to push back against clients, especially those who may have previously been unwittingly misled.

Best Practices

For the last twenty years, since the introduction of R&D tax rebates in 2001, best practice has been the provision of a detailed report, complementary to the CT600 form, to mitigate the chance of HMRC asking supplementary questions. The technical purpose of the claim as well as the business context must be covered in this report, e.g. the challenges faced; how science and technology were used to overcome these; and the professionals employed who overcame them. Simply put, if the challenges weren’t difficult to solve, it wasn’t R&D.

It’s also critical to keep in mind that R&D claims cannot simply be copied and pasted from year to year. R&D is not necessarily a constant; demand for it changes in line with the evolution of the business’ activity or stage of development. as businesses change and go to the next stage of development.

The accountant’s already solid client relationship and interpersonal abilities come into their own in such situations. Particularly if the appropriate course of action is to suggest that the client should not submit an R&D claim, an accountant must feel comfortable advising the client accordingly. The claim belongs to the client; if it is contested, the client will be the one facing an HMRC investigation. An advisor must be self-assured enough to refuse to input erroneous claims without endangering the client relationship.

Conclusion

Recent years have seen accountancy firms strengthen their position as dependable, trusted business advisors. Discussions regarding a business owner’s long-term objectives, succession and exit plans, as well as pensions and investments, have become commonplace. It should be natural to include R&D tax into these conversations . Asking a customer about their investment in R&D should be a common practice – business as usual –  just as it is to inquire about investment in infrastructure or buildings.

The only thing preventing accountants from successfully adding R&D tax to their suite of services  is a lack of confidence. Yet, any reservations can be addressed with a straightforward ‘back to basics’ R&D training course, as well as using technology to gain access to a completely new revenue stream with their current clientele. Now that HMRC is openly calling for a much more rigorous, trusted, and evidence-based approach to R&D tax from 2023, accountants hold all the cards they need to gain confidence and give clients the trusted service they desire.

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Business

Redefining the human touch with digital transformation

Source: Finance Derivative

Simon Kearsley, CEO of bluQube

It may not be a new phrase, but digital transformation is still inducing anxiety amongst 80% of employees. Reigniting the conversation around the future role of the human workforce, the COVID-19 pandemic caused 47% of business leaders to implement new technologies, and a further 29% to develop plans to do so in the near future.

Creating increased efficiencies, cost savings, and improved customer service, several new technologies are becoming ingrained within core business operations. For example, the capabilities of cloud computing have enhanced the customer experience, and many companies are also using this to digitise their supply chain. Likewise, the combination of artificial intelligence and big data can also be used to automate nearly 80% of physical work, and 70% of data-processing.

In the digital era with so many new channels for communication, the ability to receive valuable insights from customers has in practice never been greater, which can in turn be used to inform future planning. Leveraged properly, this means that technology can drive benefits and growth for not just businesses, but also their customers and even their workforce. As technology empowers staff to transition their roles from more onerous, repetitive tasks towards impactful decisions within their organisation, this encourages the workforce to better realise the value of their contributions.

A data-driven workforce

When businesses embrace data-driven digital technologies, process optimisation across various sectors of the organisation occurs. For example, digitally-led automation, such as the use of OCR software, has been able to take over many time-consuming manual tasks, including data-entry, re-keying, and core administration roles. Although tasks of this nature may have formed a large part of some employees’ roles, this doesn’t mean that anxieties around the purpose of their job must increase.

Optimisation across the business isn’t limited to processes and costs, it also extends throughout the workforce. Less monotonous roles mean that employees are free to take on strategic roles that form a more rewarding career. In practice, this access to enhanced data empowers employees to expand beyond the limited resources they have for decision-making, instead leveraging the insight collected by analytics to make more informed decisions.

By replacing repetitive tasks, staff are becoming increasingly involved in the ideation process for new products and how to improve the company’s existing services. Besides the clear benefits this has to daily productivity and efficiency, staff are equipped with the tools to more clearly demonstrate their contribution to the business and, in turn, provide greater scope for progression.

As investment in data-led solutions continues and traditional roles are reshaped around its impact, employees’ digital skillsets will act as a key driver within the talent market and generate career progression that staff may have previously felt was unattainable. However, this outcome for staff will only be achieved if managers and senior members of the company are open to change and flexible enough to evolve alongside digital transformation. Technology adaptations are inevitable, and as its organisational applications continue to expand, managers would be wise to support new digital initiatives to remain ahead of the competition.

Organisational impact

The business value provided by enhanced insights into customer preferences and behaviours cannot be overstated. With a clear overview of key behaviours, business leaders can accurately determine which areas of their processes need to be streamlined, where to focus their efforts, and how to attain the greatest possible value. On this basis, employees’ contributions will be vital for driving fundamental changes across the business, including roles in strategy development and operational management. Likewise, employees will be free to develop new product ideas and ways to improve the current service offering to benefit the business on a wider scale.

Amidst ongoing economic constraints, it has arguably never been more important for businesses to implement sustainable technologies that support their ability to respond to changing circumstances. Indeed, the insights discerned from employees’ data analysis and increased team collaboration are essential for reducing the risk of costly errors for the business.

In the coming years, AI-backed automation will become a key driver for technological change. As AI systems learn how to fit into the organisation and are programmed to improve over time, this encourages a greater focus on people on the long term. Not only should this reassure employees of their value, but it should also reassure managers that their investment was worthwhile.

Customer preferences

Further reinforcing the value of a data-led workforce is the customer preference for real, human customer service – the value of which remains remarkably high. This is recognised by the vast majority (90%) of business leaders, who believe that the human touch of customer service has become even more important amidst advancing technology, with 40% describing the continued human touch in customer service as a ‘100% mission critical focus.’

Experienced across virtually every industry, many companies may have temporarily seen customer service levels slip during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, technology is able to reverse this trend, supporting the human element of customer service with high-value data and insight. This enables teams to make decisions based on what they have learnt from evolving customer data and feedback, which can then be leveraged to improve the customer experience on an ongoing basis.

An additional benefit of digital transformation for customer service teams is that technology streamlining businesses’ operations in turn frees up organisations to provide the other crucial strand of the human touch, with dedicated customer service teams to personally connect with customers.

The bottom line

Simply enough, data-led technology significantly benefits business leaders, employees and customers alike. Achieving just base-level insights increases job satisfaction and security, encourages client retention, and instils confidence in customers that they are receiving a high-value service. For the four out of five workers that remain anxious about the implementation of digital technologies, it must be remembered that these advancements create an exciting opportunity for the human touch to grow alongside them.

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